How We Can Handle Criticism and Rejection

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In everyday life, we find people who criticize us for who we’re, how we look like, where we come from, or how we behave. In these criticisms, we sometimes face what is called “constructive criticism” and that has a lot to do with helping us find our weaknesses and looking into ways of avoiding it in future. It also helps us grow as an individual.  On the contrary, we sometimes face what is called “destructive criticism” and that is usually directed toward things we can’t change, and it’s there to hurt than to help. We often find people around us who might tell us we’re wrong, or we look bad, or we’re not as smart as they are, or maybe our hair color and the way we talk are funny, or we’re not as cool. We all have probably experienced that in different shapes and forms, and I think and after years of experience I can confidentially say it all depends on how we look at it or react back to these disapprovals of oneself, whether constructive or destructive. It can either break us into pieces or make us stronger individuals able to face the challenges of today’s world.

In the following paragraphs, I’d like to lay down for you the steps suggested by a book entitled “You Can Handle Criticism and Rejection” written for teenagers by ‘Joe Berry’ from the “Winning Skills Book” series. It highlights some methods or steps that we can take with regards to constructive and destructive criticism and rejection. Dealing with constructive criticism requires the following five steps to help us benefit from it and become better individuals.

  1. Listen carefully while we’re being criticized
  2. Thank the person who has criticized us
  3. Carefully consider the criticism we have received
  4. Decide what you need to do about the criticism
  5. Follow through with whatever we have decided to do

Dealing with destructive criticism requires the following four steps to help us get over it and not to let it take advantage of us.shutterstock_276527114

  1. Let the person who is criticizing us know that his or her destructive criticism is unacceptable
  2. Tell the person who is criticizing us how the criticism makes us feel
  3. Stop listening to the criticism
  4. Put the criticism aside

Feeling rejected can make us feel unloved or unwanted. It can quickly drop down our self-confidence. This can directly impact our performance and activity in our everyday life. It can be minimized by following the below four steps ( as described in the book ).

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  1. Remember that we are human beings and, even though we are not perfect, we are still valuable
  2. Remember, it’s the person who rejects us -not us- who has the problems
  3. Avoid being around any people who reject us
  4. Spend time with people who like and appreciate us

It all starts by taking the first step trying to make a difference. It can be tough in the beginning but trust me; it will be very rewarding by the end.

better individual for a better society

Stay Safe While Using Wi-Fi

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In today’s world, the Internet has given us several things to do. With all the huge benefit we get online, come online threats that we need to be aware of in order not to fall victim of online criminal activities.   In this article, we wish to raise the level of awareness on some of the used online threats and specifically those that are very much applicable over public or weakly secured Wi-Fi connections, and how we can avoid taken advantage of.

Man In the Middle Attack

Some cafes and restaurants these days have Wi-Fi access, freely available to the public to use for surfing the web and doing other online activities.   Some people use these Internet access methods to login to their banking accounts or do some online shopping.   shutterstock_181796174

While access is freely available to everyone, this includes the bad guys who we call “crackers or hackers” who want to steal your data.  As you login to your bank web site or do online shopping you transmit very important personal data across the network which could possibly be intercepted through what is called “Man in the Middle Attack” or in other words, the person who tries to get between you ( “your computer” ) and the site you’re trying to access. This gives them the right amount of data to capture your online transactions, including your login credentials.

For transmitting personal information online, it’s highly recommended that you login through your private highly secured network, at your premises to avoid such attack.

Evil Twin Attack

As hotels, Internet parks, cafes, and restaurants try to limit access to only their customers, they often create what we call “Internet access” page where the customer is given a code to access with, in order to continue over to the Internet.  This page could possibly be faked by a “cracker” trying to intercept all your traffic data after you’ve successfully accessed the Internet using their page and not the official page of the place you’re staying at.

This usually happens as for a “normal user” it might be little difficult to notice the difference between both pages.

In order to be safe, you need to check with the hotel front desk, the concierge, or the head waiter whether this is the right page to access before you start using the Internet. Or if you’re in a park where the internet is provided ( iPark ), you should contact the call center to verify the authenticity of the page.

War Driving Attack

Now, hackers use their cars along with highly sophisticated hardware and software technology which is widely available in the market to locate wireless networks with weak or no security available in their neighbor.  The moment they’re able to access your network, the easier it will get to intercept all your traffic data including your login credentials and much more personal information about you and your family.

In order to avoid such attack, it’s highly recommended to put on security configuration on your Internet access devices (“routers”) using the technology “WPA2” to securely protect your passwords and data from eavesdropping.

 

For more information on online safety, please keep in touch with Safe Space website and follow the hashtag on Twitter #safespaceQA.

-stay safe, stay connected-